Video Update from Darren Hardy–End of Week 3

A VIDEO MESSAGE FROM DARREN HARDY:
Here’s a summary of week three in our journey towards Designing the Best 10 Years of Your Life where I answer your questions and give you a course update.
I’ve also selected some of your questions and observations left in the comments sections along with some of my responses. I hope you find it helpful to peruse through the common questions and insights shared by others experiencing the process along with you.

Please watch the video: CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO
In case you missed any of the worksheet downloads:
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 6

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 5

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 4

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 3

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 2

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 1

Video Update from Darren Hardy–End of Week 3

A VIDEO MESSAGE FROM DARREN HARDY:
Here’s a summary of week three in our journey towards Designing the Best 10 Years of Your Life where I answer your questions and give you a course update.
I’ve also selected some of your questions and observations left in the comments sections along with some of my responses. I hope you find it helpful to peruse through the common questions and insights shared by others experiencing the process along with you.

Please watch the video: CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO
In case you missed any of the worksheet downloads:
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 6

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 5

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 4

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 3

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 2

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD WORKSHEET 1

This is one in a series of interviews of self help experts and bloggers in the Tips from Masters series.
pic.php  Tips from Masters: Donald Latumahina of Life Optimizer on staying focused with ultradian sprintDonald Latumahina writes about personal growth and effectiveness at Life Optimizer. His mission is helping people live life to the fullest. Donald shares a great technique on staying focused with ultradian sprint. Enjoy!
1. How did you find your passion? What do you think is the best way to find it?
I found my passions by following my curiosity and exploring many different things. Over time, a pattern emerged that showed certain things I consistently do and enjoy. I then realized that these are my passions and I started to take them seriously.
From that experience, I think the best way to find your passions is to explore many different things and see what stick. Those that you consistently enjoy are your passions. Having a curious mind is helpful here because it makes you interested in many more things and hence explore more diverse fields.
2. How do you go from goal setting to implementation? How do you make sure that you take constant action toward your goals?
First of all, I make sure that I only set goals that matter to me. This way I can be sure that I have the necessary motivation to reach them.
Then I just plan the necessary steps to reach the goals, do them, and adjust them along the way. The motivation part is key because it makes the rest much easier.
3. How do you stay focused? How do you keep distractions at bay?
For my life as a whole, I have a short mission statement that I always keep in mind. This statement states my life purpose and helps me stay on track.
For my day-to-day work, I stay focused by doing the so-called ultradian sprint. Here I do intense work for certain period of time and then take a true break before repeating the cycle. Since this is a “sprint”, there is a sense of urgency. The sense of urgency helps me focus on the task at hand and prevents me from being distracted.
If you want to learn more from Donald, visit his blog, Life Optimizer, or follow him on Twitter @lifeoptimizer.

 Tips from Masters: Donald Latumahina of Life Optimizer on staying focused with ultradian sprint

1. The Miracle of Personal Development

Jim Rohn

One day my mentor Mr. Shoaff said, “Jim, if you want to be wealthy and happy, learn this lesson well: Learn to work harder on yourself than you do on your job.”

Since that time I’ve been working on my own personal development. And I must admit that this has been the most challenging assignment of all. This business of personal development lasts a lifetime.

You see, what you become is far more important than what you get. The important question to ask on the job is not, “What am I getting?” Instead, you should ask, “What am I becoming?” Getting and becoming are like Siamese twins: What you become directly influences what you get. Think of it this way: Most of what you have today you have attracted by becoming the person you are today.

I’ve also found that income rarely exceeds personal development. Sometimes income takes a lucky jump, but unless you learn to handle the responsibilities that come with it, it will usually shrink back to the amount you can handle.

If someone hands you a million dollars, you’d better hurry up and become a millionaire. A very rich man once said, “If you took all the money in the world and divided it equally among everybody, it would soon be back in the same pockets it was before.”

It is hard to keep that which has not been obtained through personal development.

So here’s the great axiom of life:

To have more than you’ve got, become more than you are.

This is where you should focus most of your attention. Otherwise, you just might have to contend with the axiom of not changing, which is:

Unless you change how you are, you’ll always have what you’ve got.

SAVE now when you choose from four remarkable audio CD sets from top experts on goal-setting, including Jim Rohn, Chris Widener, Zig Ziglar, Denis Waitley and John Fleming! Click here now for complete details.


To read previous articles and quotes from the Jim Rohn Weekly Newsletter Archives; to get a complete listing of Jim Rohn’s books, audios, videos and seminar schedule; or to place an order, visit: http://www.JimRohn.com or call 800-929-0434, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. CST.

1. The Miracle of Personal Development

Jim Rohn

One day my mentor Mr. Shoaff said, “Jim, if you want to be wealthy and happy, learn this lesson well: Learn to work harder on yourself than you do on your job.”

Since that time I’ve been working on my own personal development. And I must admit that this has been the most challenging assignment of all. This business of personal development lasts a lifetime.

You see, what you become is far more important than what you get. The important question to ask on the job is not, “What am I getting?” Instead, you should ask, “What am I becoming?” Getting and becoming are like Siamese twins: What you become directly influences what you get. Think of it this way: Most of what you have today you have attracted by becoming the person you are today.

I’ve also found that income rarely exceeds personal development. Sometimes income takes a lucky jump, but unless you learn to handle the responsibilities that come with it, it will usually shrink back to the amount you can handle.

If someone hands you a million dollars, you’d better hurry up and become a millionaire. A very rich man once said, “If you took all the money in the world and divided it equally among everybody, it would soon be back in the same pockets it was before.”

It is hard to keep that which has not been obtained through personal development.

So here’s the great axiom of life:

To have more than you’ve got, become more than you are.

This is where you should focus most of your attention. Otherwise, you just might have to contend with the axiom of not changing, which is:

Unless you change how you are, you’ll always have what you’ve got.

SAVE now when you choose from four remarkable audio CD sets from top experts on goal-setting, including Jim Rohn, Chris Widener, Zig Ziglar, Denis Waitley and John Fleming! Click here now for complete details.


To read previous articles and quotes from the Jim Rohn Weekly Newsletter Archives; to get a complete listing of Jim Rohn’s books, audios, videos and seminar schedule; or to place an order, visit: http://www.JimRohn.com or call 800-929-0434, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. CST.